Stay Cautious! Protect Yourself and Your Loved Ones

Southern Californians always need to prepare for two types of natural disasters: Earthquakes and Wild fires. We all love those hot summer days but unfortunately, they often lead to wildfires that endanger our lives, homes and animals. That’s why it is extremely important to stay safe and take precautions to prevent more damage.

When a brush fire is burning near our homes, we all panic and hope that it gets put out as soon as possible. A million things run through our mind! Is anyone hurt? Can it be controlled? Will I have to be evacuated?  While we focus on our lives and wellbeing, we have the brave fire fighters and fire crew on our minds, hoping they remain safe!

When we are in this situation it is important that we stay calm and seek safety.

Here are a few steps to help you get through such situations:

  1. Keep the area CLEAR! It may get hot, but it is extremely important to keep our backyards well kept. Make sure to pick up any dry leaves or materials that are likely to 2. If possible, trim off any hanging branches that can attract flames.
  2. Screen, Seal, and Close! Smoke may enter through vents, window or doors. Be sure to close these correctly to minimize the volume of smoke that enters our homes.
  3. Keep it all together! It is always a great idea to keep all important documents in a safe and easily accessible location in case of emergency evacuations. You should include documents such as birth certificates, passports, vaccination cards, or anything else you feel may be important..

REMEMBER, if it is not safe it is important that you leave it behind. Material items are replaceable. Your well being matters the most!

For more tips on wild fire safety please visit: www.firewise.org

 

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number H80CS10607 Health Center Program, total award amount of $2,493,062 with 88.9% financed with nongovernmental sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.