The Art of Conversation!

There you go again. You’re having an amazing conversation with somebody until suddenly, you realize you don’t know what to say next. The other person continues to speak, but at this point, you have zoned out, focused on how to keep the conversation going. Soon enough, it’s your turn to talk but your mind has gone blank and you’ve got nothing to say. Cue the awkward silence.

Mastering the art of conversation isn’t an easy task, but fear not! Here are some tips to help you develop more refined communication skills.

  1. Condition to Listen!
    Instead of thinking what to say next, focus all your attention to what the other person is saying. Being present and actively listening will increase your chances of having better ideas of how to respond.
  2. Question For Progression
    Questions act as the lubricant to conversation. Asking open ended questions not only shows that you’re interested in what the other person has to say, but also builds a bridge to deeper and more meaningful discussions. If you‘re having trouble thinking of what open ended questions to ask, refer to the five W’s: Who, What, When, Where, and Why.
  3. Don’t Be Stale, Tell A Tale
    Your life is full of stories, so speak about them! Recalling relatable events give life to the conversation and could lead to other interesting topics for you and the other party to talk about.
  4. Ee-nun-cee-ate
    In order to get your point across properly, mumbling and stuttering just won’t do! Sit up straight and speak clearly. Mumbling and stuttering are results of your mouth talking faster than your tongue can follow, so take your time when you talk. It also doesn’t hurt to show your teeth when you speak. It helps make enunciating a lot easier!

Conclusion

Communicating is an important skill to have, but if you think you’re not good at it– don’t worry! Practice using these tips every time you chat with people, and before you know it you’ll be great a conversationalist!

Source: https://www.helpguide.org/articles/relationships-communication/effective-communication.htm

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number H80CS10607 Health Center Program, total award amount of $2,493,062 with 88.9% financed with nongovernmental sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.