Food Safety is NO Joke!

Do you practice food safety? If you are cooking for you or  your family be sure that you handle the food safely.

The steps below are great to follow when handling food:

CLEAN

Constantly wash hands and surfaces!

  • It is important that you wash your hands and surfaces because bacteria can contaminate food you prepare, and harm you or your family.
  • Remember to wash hands properly for at least 20 seconds with soap and water.
  • Be sure that all utensils are properly washed to prevent cross contamination.
SEPARATE

Do Not Cross Contaminate!

  • Raw meats, chicken, fish, and eggs can spread different illnesses because of the bacteria they naturally carry. It is really important that you don’t handle these food items near vegetables and remember to separate cooking meats and veggies.
  • Have a plate for raw and cooked meats and remember not to place them on the same plate.
  • Replace your cutting board once it starts to look worn out to avoid bacteria from hiding in small cuts.
  • Store raw meat separately from other food items in the fridge.
COOK

Cook at the right temperatures!

    • To avoid bacteria from growing, be sure to always freeze your food below 40· and when cooking a hot meal be sure to keep the temperature above 140· Fahrenheit.
    • 40·-140· is a DANGER ZONE for food safety.
CHILL

Put your food in the refrigerator

    • Bacteria will begin to grow in your food if you do not put the food away in the refrigerator on time.
    • Refrigerate your food promptly. Don’t leave food out for more than two hours. In the summer, food should be put away within an hour after consumption.

(Food Safety, 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/basics/chill/index.html

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number H80CS10607 Health Center Program, total award amount of $2,493,062 with 88.9% financed with nongovernmental sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.