Do You Remember the Time?

As you get older, it seems like you become more forgetful or you simply don’t have the head space to retain the information we receive on a daily basis. While you can’t get around the fact that your memory speed slightly decreases every 10 years of your life, here are 5 things to do to help your brain out:

Catch some zzz’s

Skipping out on hours of sleep may be the reason you sometimes forget a thing or two. Deep sleep can help shift memories into your long term brain space. If you get less than eight hours of sleep, you may want to adjust your bedtime.

Don’t go through that door!

It’s happened to you before. You’ve walked through a doorway and lost your train of thought. Researchers aren’t sure why this happens but recent studies have shown a correlation between recall memory and walking into a new space. So when trying to remember information, avoid the door.

Be STILL

Amongst all the hustle and bustle of everyday life, you will need to be still to remember information. At least for 8 seconds- that’s what studies have shown. Concentration during this short amount of time can help transfer memories from short term to long-term memory

Eat right, Think Right

Food impacts your thought process. Although the sugars and fats may keep you temporarily alert, it doesn’t serve the brain well. If you don’t already, be sure to include antioxidant rich foods, including colorful fruits and vegetables into you food diet.

Get ready to rumble!

Well, not really–just close your fists in rumble position and that should do it. Research has shown that clenching the fist of the opposite hand you write with can help you recall information you have recently memorized; however, If balling up your fists in fighting stance isn’t your thing, you could do some exercise instead. Exercise has a similar effect of increasing alertness and blood flow.

Image source: http://www.prevention.com/health/why-youre-forgetful
This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number H80CS10607 Health Center Program, total award amount of $2,493,062 with 88.9% financed with nongovernmental sources. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.